Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Fly Fishing Pennsylvania's Valley Creek

A small limestone spring-fed creek flows through the Valley Forge National Historical Park. While Americans generally head to the park to learn about General Washington and the winter of 1777-1778, I went for the wild brown trout that live in Valley Creek. I fished upstream of the dam/waterfall and caught three wild browns, two on a spinner and one on a wooly bugger streamer. I lost a decent-sized fish just upstream of the covered bridge. It wasn't an easy day, however.

When I first arrived in the park, I drove along as much of the river as I could. I do this in order to scout out potential fishing spots. I saw a few nice runs, and decided to try downstream of the covered bridge. I had a tough time, although I saw a few nice fish. This middle section of the river is dotted with long, glassy pools. I could move the trout, but I couldn't make them take the fly in the cold November water. In the summer, terrestrial patterns will probably be effective in that type of water. I caught my three fish once I moved to the area above the covered bridge. All three were under six inches, but they were all beautiful wild browns. In the end, it was a nice day on a new wild trout stream.

If you are interested in heading to Valley Creek keep a few things in mind. The river is catch-and-release because of historical pollution problems. It also gets very mucky/muddy in the lower stretches, so make sure you wear proper foot-wear. Valley Creek isn't a river you want to go to if you're seeking isolation. Its proximity to Philadelphia (its the finest wild trout stream in that part of Pennsylvania) makes it heavily populated with other anglers. In addition, many other types of people use the river. For example, I ran into a wildlife photographer who was photographing warblers. She was so quiet and blended into the surroundings that I didn't see her until it was too late. Now she has photos of warblers...and one fly fisherman. Oh well.

Image #1 - Valley Creek and the covered bridge
Image #2 - Wild brown trout (I specialize in catching the smallest trout in the river, apparently)
Image #3 - Covered bridge from below

Overall Total: 147

River Breakdown:

Teetertown Brook - 18 (18 Wild Brook)
Spring Creek - 16 (13 Wild Rainbow, 3 Wild Brown)
Marshalls Creek - 14 (14 Wild Brook)
Raritan River, South Branch - 12 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Bushkill Creek - 8 (6 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Wissahickon Creek - 7 (6 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brown)
Swift River - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Elk Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Elk River - 5 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Penns Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Paulinskill River - 4 (2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Pennypack Creek - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Rockaway Creek - 4 (4 Wild Brown)
Stony Brook - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Clear Fork of the Mohican River - 3 (3 Stocked Brown Trout)
Fishing Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Lost Cove Creek - 3 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook)
Old Town Run - 3 (2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Valley Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Yellow Breeches Creek - 3 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brodhead Creek - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Hickory Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Little Brook - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Roaring Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Big Gunpowder Falls River - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Little Glade Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Meadow Run - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Mill Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mud Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Poplar Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Schooley's Mountain Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Trout Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
White Deer Creek - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Species Breakdown:

Brook Trout - 51
Wild - 44
Stocked - 7

Brown Trout - 48
Wild - 28
Stocked - 20

Rainbow Trout - 48
Stocked - 33
Wild - 15


Wild Trout - 87
Stocked Trout - 60


Trout 15+ Inches: 11


Fly Breakdown:
Olive Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 25 (23 Wild Brook, 2 Wild Brown)
Bead-head Pheasant Tail Nymph, size 14 - 10 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown)
Gummy Stonefly, size 14 - 9 (7 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Wild Brown)
Green Weenie, size 14 - 8 (4 Wild Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 2 Wild Brown)
Brown Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 6 (5 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Green Weenie, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Light Cahill, size 16 - 6 (5 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
San Juan Worm, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook)
Tan Caddis, size 14 - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Pink Shrimp, size 14 - 4 (4 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 16 - 4 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Copper John Nymph, size 16 - 3 (3 Wild Brook)
Black Caddis, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Brown)
Bead-head Black Stonefly Nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Black Streamer, size 10 - 2 (2 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Stonefly nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Ladybug, size 16 - 2 (2 Wild Rainbow)
Wet Ant, size 14 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Rainbow)
Bead-head Green Weenie, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Bead-head Hare's Ear Nymph, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Rainbow)
Blue Quill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Winged Olive, size 18 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Golden Stonefly, size 8 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Scud, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Walts Worm, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Angling Breakdown:

Fly Fishing Rod - 115 (32 Wild Brook, 26 Stocked Rainbow, 17 Stocked Brown, 17 Wild Brown, 15 Wild Rainbow, 5 Stocked Brook)
Spinning Rod - 32 (12 Wild Brook, 8 Wild Brown, 7 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Brook)


State Breakdown:
Pennsylvania - 78
New Jersey - 48
North Carolina - 9
Massachusetts - 6
Ohio - 3
Virginia - 2
Maryland - 1

Thursday, November 12, 2009

Fly Fishing Philadelphia's Wissahickon Creek and Pennypack Creek

I was originally going to break these two trips into disparate blog entries, but the typical end-of-semester pressures are starting to wreak havoc on my free-time. So I'm going to write about fishing the Wissahickon and Pennypack in this single post.

The Wissahickon
I was ecstatic when I discovered that two fall-stocked trout streams were less than 30 miles away from my new South Jersey residence. Living down here amid the overcrowded suburban sprawl, the sandy soil, the muddy rivers, and the pine tree forests hasn't exactly filled my mind with images of beautiful wild trout. That being said, my access to the highway and relative proximity to Philadelphia allows me to be in Pennsylvania in under ten minutes (with no traffic). I researched online and found that both the Wissahickon Creek and the Pennypack Creek receive a dose of fresh trout from the state hatcheries in the fall. A few weeks ago, I decided to fish both of them.

On Tuesday I drove to the historic Wissahickon. Flowing on the periphery of Philadelphia, the river has been a site for artistic contemplation, literary recreation, and open-space reform. I fished the stream from Chesnut Hill College to the stone bridge. This small section of water features some decent tumbles, deep pools, and fast ripples. In a way, it reminded me of the Musconetcong River in northern Jersey. Because it is so far south, though, I doubt wild trout can reproduce in its warmer waters. Nevertheless, the state buoys trout fishing by consistently stocking the river in both the spring and fall.

I caught seven trout: six stocked rainbow, and one stocked brown. I caught five of them on the fly rod, using a mixture of streamers and nymphs. I caught the other two on my trusty Rapala. I let them all go and hope others do the same; this way, the fishing will remain decent until the spring.

I would certainly return to the Wissahickon. I like its flow, its pools, and its consistency as a stream (every part of it is fishable). In addition, its proximity to the college and its multiple walking trails give it a pastoral, bucolic feel while nonetheless instilling it with an atmosphere of community. You are never quite alone when you fish the Wissahickon, as students jog and people walk their dogs right along the river. And this is a good thing. I will definitely be back.

The Pennypack
I didn't enjoy the Pennypack nearly as much. It was a difficult drive, taking over 40 minutes despite being only 24 miles away from my apartment. Driving through northeast Philadelphia wasn't exactly pristine: it's not exactly ghetto-like, but it's not eye-appealing either. In the end, the journey to the river does count for something, and I therefore would rather pass historic homes, stone bridges, and deer (the Wissahickon) on my drive than a string of Dollar Trees and Wawas. The Pennypack Park, though, was beautiful. It's well maintained and located in an excellent area. I particularly loved the beautiful farm adjacent to the park grounds.

The river itself was nice and clean, but it lacked a steep gradient. Immediately downstream from the parking area, the stream becomes flat and sluggish. This type of slow moving, deep water isn't conducive to fly fishing (or trout fishing in general). I ended up catching four trout, all stocked rainbows. Three of the trout took nymphs or streamers and one took the Rapala. It was a fun trip, but it wasn't nearly as entertaining as my trip to the Wissahickon. I would go back because of its proximity to where I live, not because I really liked it.

Image #1 - Rolling hills of southeastern Pennsylvania
Image #2 - Wissahickon Creek
Image #3 - Stocked rainbow from the Pennypack Creek
Image #4 - Pennypack Creek


Overall Total: 144

River Breakdown:

Teetertown Brook - 18 (18 Wild Brook)
Spring Creek - 16 (13 Wild Rainbow, 3 Wild Brown)
Marshalls Creek - 14 (14 Wild Brook)
Raritan River, South Branch - 12 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Bushkill Creek - 8 (6 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Wissahickon Creek - 7 (6 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brown)
Swift River - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Elk Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Elk River - 5 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Penns Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Paulinskill River - 4 (2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Pennypack Creek - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Rockaway Creek - 4 (4 Wild Brown)
Stony Brook - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Clear Fork of the Mohican River - 3 (3 Stocked Brown Trout)
Fishing Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Lost Cove Creek - 3 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook)
Old Town Run - 3 (2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Yellow Breeches Creek - 3 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brodhead Creek - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Hickory Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Little Brook - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Roaring Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Big Gunpowder Falls River - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Little Glade Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Meadow Run - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Mill Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mud Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Poplar Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Schooley's Mountain Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Trout Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
White Deer Creek - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Species Breakdown:

Brook Trout - 51
Wild - 44
Stocked - 7

Rainbow Trout - 48
Stocked - 33
Wild - 15

Brown Trout - 45
Wild - 25
Stocked - 20


Wild Trout - 84
Stocked Trout - 60


Trout 15+ Inches: 11


Fly Breakdown:
Olive Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 24 (23 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Bead-head Pheasant Tail Nymph, size 14 - 10 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown)
Gummy Stonefly, size 14 - 9 (7 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Wild Brown)
Green Weenie, size 14 - 8 (4 Wild Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 2 Wild Brown)
Brown Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 6 (5 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Green Weenie, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Light Cahill, size 16 - 6 (5 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
San Juan Worm, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook)
Tan Caddis, size 14 - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Pink Shrimp, size 14 - 4 (4 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 16 - 4 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Copper John Nymph, size 16 - 3 (3 Wild Brook)
Black Caddis, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Brown)
Bead-head Black Stonefly Nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Black Streamer, size 10 - 2 (2 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Stonefly nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Ladybug, size 16 - 2 (2 Wild Rainbow)
Wet Ant, size 14 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Rainbow)
Bead-head Green Weenie, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Bead-head Hare's Ear Nymph, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Rainbow)
Blue Quill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Winged Olive, size 18 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Golden Stonefly, size 8 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Scud, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Walts Worm, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Angling Breakdown:

Fly Fishing Rod - 112 (32 Wild Brook, 26 Stocked Rainbow, 17 Stocked Brown, 17 Wild Brown, 15 Wild Rainbow, 5 Stocked Brook)
Spinning Rod - 32 (12 Wild Brook, 8 Wild Brown, 7 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Brook)


State Breakdown:
Pennsylvania - 75
New Jersey - 48
North Carolina - 9
Massachusetts - 6
Ohio - 3
Virginia - 2
Maryland - 1

Monday, November 9, 2009

Fly Fishing the Brodhead Creek in October

A few weeks ago, my friend Will and I drove to the Poconos to fish Marshalls Creek and the Brodhead. Both of our families hail from New Jersey, but the two of us grew up in northeastern Pennsylvania. In a strange inversion, we've since relocated back to our ancestral state of New Jersey - him to the Princeton area, myself to southern NJ (recently). It was therefore nice to spend a few hours fishing two rivers we know exceedingly well.

The day was cold, and it snowed. Fishing in the high thirties and low forties isn't exactly ideal, but trout generally don't mind. We wore warm clothes and stayed dry, and by the end of the afternoon the sun started heating up the chilly mountain air. We started at Marshalls Creek, near Will's house. Normally, the wild brook trout of this tiny mountain stream are relatively easy to catch. But it wasn't normal: an amalgamation of abnormal temperature, heavy rain, and decreased sunlight likely created adverse fishing conditions. I ended up catching only one wild brook on a size 14 wooly bugger streamer.

We then drove to the town of East Stroudsburg, where we fished the Brodhead Creek from the high school to the Interstate 80 bridge. This stretch of river receives fall stocking from the state, and Will caught three stocked trout. I got none. This wasn't the first time the Brodhead has treated me poorly. And despite all of my knowledge, all of my experience, and all of my ardent efforts, I ended up with nothing. It was a reminder that this sport is often brutal and excoriating. At least my friend caught a few fish; but whatever I did failed. The only consolation prize for me was watching a beautiful bald eagle fly along the creek.

Image #1 - My only trout, a 3.5 inch wild brook.
Image #2 - Poconos in fall.


Overall Total: 133

River Breakdown:

Teetertown Brook - 18 (18 Wild Brook)
Spring Creek - 16 (13 Wild Rainbow, 3 Wild Brown)
Marshalls Creek - 14 (14 Wild Brook)
Raritan River, South Branch - 12 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Bushkill Creek - 8 (6 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Swift River - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Elk Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Elk River - 5 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Penns Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Stony Brook - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Paulinskill River - 4 (2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Rockaway Creek - 4 (4 Wild Brown)
Clear Fork of the Mohican River - 3 (3 Stocked Brown Trout)
Fishing Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Lost Cove Creek - 3 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook)
Old Town Run - 3 (2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Yellow Breeches Creek - 3 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brodhead Creek - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Hickory Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Little Brook - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Roaring Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Big Gunpowder Falls River - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Little Glade Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Meadow Run - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Mill Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mud Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Poplar Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Schooley's Mountain Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Trout Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
White Deer Creek - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Species Breakdown:

Brook Trout - 51
Wild - 44
Stocked - 7

Brown Trout - 44
Wild - 25
Stocked - 19

Rainbow Trout - 38
Stocked - 23
Wild - 15


Wild Trout - 84
Stocked Trout - 49


Trout 15+ Inches: 11


Fly Breakdown:
Olive Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 24 (23 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Bead-head Pheasant Tail Nymph, size 14 - 10 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown)
Green Weenie, size 14 - 8 (4 Wild Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 2 Wild Brown)
Brown Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 6 (5 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Green Weenie, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Light Cahill, size 16 - 6 (5 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
San Juan Worm, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook)
Tan Caddis, size 14 - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Pink Shrimp, size 14 - 4 (4 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 16 - 4 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Copper John Nymph, size 16 - 3 (3 Wild Brook)
Black Caddis, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Brown)
Gummy Stonefly, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Black Stonefly Nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Stonefly nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Ladybug, size 16 - 2 (2 Wild Rainbow)
Wet Ant, size 14 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Rainbow)
Bead-head Green Weenie, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Bead-head Hare's Ear Nymph, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Rainbow)
Blue Quill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Winged Olive, size 18 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Golden Stonefly, size 8 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Scud, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Walts Worm, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Angling Breakdown:

Fly Fishing Rod - 104 (32 Wild Brook, 18 Stocked Rainbow, 17 Stocked Brown, 17 Wild Brown, 15 Wild Rainbow, 5 Stocked Brook)
Spinning Rod - 29 (12 Wild Brook, 8 Wild Brown, 5 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Brown)


State Breakdown:
Pennsylvania - 64
New Jersey - 48
North Carolina - 9
Massachusetts - 6
Ohio - 3
Virginia - 2
Maryland - 1

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Fly Fishing the Poconos in September

My sister recently had a baby, so I've had a chance to spend some time in northeastern Pennsylvania. I was able to fly fish a few times in between visits with family. Fly fishing in the fall is always a pleasant undertaking. I love the crisp air, the smell of the decaying leaves, and the bright foliage that transforms the verdant landscape into a collage of color. The fishing is often superb: trout begin to emerge from the high heat of the summer, tiny blue-winged olive hatches can be as productive as any spring hatch, and streamer success rises considerably as the water cools down.

That being said, there are a few drawbacks to fall weather fly fishing. While ostensibly beautiful, falling leaves wreak havoc on dry fly drifts. I can't tell you how many times I've laid down a perfect cast only to have it disrupted by a red maple leaf. The cooler weather also presents its own challenges, and fly fishermen should dress appropriately for the colder temperatures. When the autumn sun sinks behind a central Pennsylvania ridge or a Pocono tree-line, the heat of the day dissipates with celerity. In addition, all anglers should note the arrival of hunting season and wear an orange hat (at least) if you venture onto state land. You certainly don't want your brown fishing vest and waders to be mistaken for deer fur.

I caught ten trout in the Poconos. Five were stocked brown trout from the Bushkill Creek. I caught all five on small light cahill dry fly patterns. I also caught five wild brook trout from Marshalls Creek. All five took a size 14 brown wooly bugger. Continue to check back for more fall updates; however, the blog won't be as frequently updated because of my teaching schedule and approaching doctoral examinations. Whenever I do get a chance to fly fish, I will make sure to post.

Image #1 - Wild brook trout from Marshalls Creek
Image #2 - Bushkill Creek at dusk
Image #3 - White snakeroot and woodland sunflower in bloom

Overall Total: 132

River Breakdown:

Teetertown Brook - 18 (18 Wild Brook)
Spring Creek - 16 (13 Wild Rainbow, 3 Wild Brown)
Marshalls Creek - 13 (13 Wild Brook)
Raritan River, South Branch - 12 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Bushkill Creek - 8 (6 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Swift River - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Elk Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Elk River - 5 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Penns Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Stony Brook - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Paulinskill River - 4 (2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Rockaway Creek - 4 (4 Wild Brown)
Clear Fork of the Mohican River - 3 (3 Stocked Brown Trout)
Fishing Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Lost Cove Creek - 3 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook)
Old Town Run - 3 (2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Yellow Breeches Creek - 3 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brodhead Creek - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Hickory Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Little Brook - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Roaring Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Big Gunpowder Falls River - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Little Glade Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Meadow Run - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Mill Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mud Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Poplar Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Schooley's Mountain Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Trout Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
White Deer Creek - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Species Breakdown:

Brook Trout - 50
Wild - 43
Stocked - 7

Brown Trout - 44
Wild - 25
Stocked - 19

Rainbow Trout - 38
Stocked - 23
Wild - 15


Wild Trout - 83
Stocked Trout - 49


Trout 15+ Inches: 11


Fly Breakdown:
Olive Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 23 (22 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Bead-head Pheasant Tail Nymph, size 14 - 10 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown)
Green Weenie, size 14 - 8 (4 Wild Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 2 Wild Brown)
Brown Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 6 (5 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Green Weenie, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Light Cahill, size 16 - 6 (5 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
San Juan Worm, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook)
Tan Caddis, size 14 - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Pink Shrimp, size 14 - 4 (4 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 16 - 4 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Copper John Nymph, size 16 - 3 (3 Wild Brook)
Black Caddis, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Brown)
Gummy Stonefly, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Black Stonefly Nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Stonefly nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Ladybug, size 16 - 2 (2 Wild Rainbow)
Wet Ant, size 14 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Rainbow)
Bead-head Green Weenie, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Bead-head Hare's Ear Nymph, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Rainbow)
Blue Quill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Winged Olive, size 18 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Golden Stonefly, size 8 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Scud, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Walts Worm, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Angling Breakdown:

Fly Fishing Rod - 103 (31 Wild Brook, 18 Stocked Rainbow, 17 Stocked Brown, 17 Wild Brown, 15 Wild Rainbow, 5 Stocked Brook)
Spinning Rod - 29 (12 Wild Brook, 8 Wild Brown, 5 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Brown)


State Breakdown:
Pennsylvania - 63
New Jersey - 48
North Carolina - 9
Massachusetts - 6
Ohio - 3
Virginia - 2
Maryland - 1

Monday, September 7, 2009

Surf Fishing the Outer Banks in mid-August

Surf fishing and fly fishing are fundamentally dissimilar. In fact, these activities are on opposite ends of the fishing spectrum. Fly fishing is (often) about precision and timing; surf fishing, on the other hand, is (often) about strength and power. While a fly fisherman uses bird feathers, deer hair, and rabbit fur to craft an imitation worthy of fooling a wary trout, a surf fisherman cuts up squid, bloodworms, or fresh fish to land his quarry. Fly rods are long and slender, a fine-tuned blend of force and yield. Surf fishing rods are long and thick, a testament to the power of the ocean and its fish. These inherent differences are unavoidable and striking. The similarity between the two forms is less apparent, but no less interesting.

To be a successful surf fisherman or fly fisherman, a person must have a deep understanding of ocean and river environments. For surf fishing, this means a knowledge of currents and sandbars; tides and temperatures; and, weather conditions and calendar quirks. For fly fishing, this means a comprehension of mayfly hatches and cubic flow; trout behavior and casting technique; and, (again) weather conditions and calendar quirks. A surf fisherman or a fly fisherman can spend a lifetime gaining environmental knowledge. For those who don't possess this type of acumen, the internet and bookshelves are loaded with important and necessary information.

There are other similarities between the two fishing forms. For example, the way that a fisherman approaches a fight remains relatively constant. If a fly angler lets a trout flee into a fast rapid section, she risks losing the fish; if a surfisher allows a large ray to bury itself in the sand, he will likely end the battle exhausted and defeated (more on this specific scenario later). Both sports enable a human to engage with the natural world and emerge better for the experience. And, finally, both produce feelings of euphoria following a successful catch. In the end, a landed fish is a landed fish, and the difference between dainty wild brook trout and powerful bluefish melds away amid celebratory shouts and photographs.

I caught over 40 fish from the surf during my week at the Outer Banks. Ostensibly on a relaxing beach vacation with my fiancee's family, I spent hours upon hours catching croaker, spot, whiting, northern kingfish, and even a skate. It wasn't the first time I've surf fished, and I believe that my previous experiences have made me into a competent practitioner of the craft. I catch a lot of smaller fish, but the novelty of landing unfamiliar species generates excitement about even the tiniest ocean fish. The highlight of the week came when I caught a small skate (a ray) in the frothy wash of the shore. With its tail, the fish was nearly two feet long. The other memorable moment happened when I hooked a bigger ray, only to have it bury itself in the sand. Some teenage boys helped me force the fish to the surface, but it snapped off as I tried to pull it out of the water. A good time was had by all, and the ray taught me that I can't always expect to take on a fish and win.

While I would rarely choose surf fishing over fly fishing, I find both to be highly entertaining enterprises. If you have never taken up a surf rod, I recommend giving it a try.

Monday, August 24, 2009

Fly Fishing Western Pennsylvania's Youghiogheny River and Meadow Run

A few weekends ago I went white-water rafting on the Youghiogheny River with my fiancee's family. While we primarily drove to Ohiopyle, PA to celebrate her father's 50th birthday, I was nonetheless able to sneak a few casts into this well-regarded river and one of its many tributaries. After our white-water adventure, Jackie and I briefly fished upstream of the Ohiopyle Falls in the "Middle Yough" section of the big river. I caught a nice smallmouth using a big wooly bugger streamer, but the famous Youghiogheny brown trout were nowhere to be found. At this point, I will spare readers of this blog another rant about big tailwater streams; however, the size and flow of the river make fishing the Yough next to impossible without flotation.

Before driving back to the DC metropolitan area, Jackie and I hiked up Meadow Run, one of the big river's tributaries. Aside from the throngs of people swimming in it, Meadow Run was a pleasant and picturesque place to fly fish. Augmented by a plentiful stocking regimen, the small stream boasts a decent population of trout. I was lucky enough to land one stocked brook trout on a Walts Worm pattern. Because we had to drive nearly 3.5 hours back to Washington, we left immediately following this success.

Please check back soon for an update about my time surf fishing the Outer Banks. It was an excellent experience, and I look forward to posting pictures of some of my saltwater catches.

Image #1 - The brook trout
Image #2 - Fly fishing Meadow Run

Overall Total: 122

River Breakdown:

Teetertown Brook - 18 (18 Wild Brook)
Spring Creek - 16 (13 Wild Rainbow, 3 Wild Brown)
Raritan River, South Branch - 12 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Marshalls Creek - 8 (8 Wild Brook)
Swift River - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Elk Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Elk River - 5 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Penns Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Stony Brook - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Paulinskill River - 4 (2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Rockaway Creek - 4 (4 Wild Brown)
Bushkill Creek - 3 (2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brown)
Clear Fork of the Mohican River - 3 (3 Stocked Brown Trout)
Fishing Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Lost Cove Creek - 3 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook)
Old Town Run - 3 (2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Yellow Breeches Creek - 3 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brodhead Creek - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Hickory Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Little Brook - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Roaring Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Big Gunpowder Falls River - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Little Glade Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Meadow Run - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Mill Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mud Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Poplar Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Schooley's Mountain Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Trout Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
White Deer Creek - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Species Breakdown:

Brook Trout - 45
Wild - 38
Stocked - 7

Brown Trout - 39
Wild - 25
Stocked - 14

Rainbow Trout - 38
Stocked - 23
Wild - 15


Wild Trout - 78
Stocked Trout - 44


Trout 15+ Inches: 11


Fly Breakdown:
Olive Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 23 (22 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Bead-head Pheasant Tail Nymph, size 14 - 10 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown)
Green Weenie, size 14 - 8 (4 Wild Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 2 Wild Brown)
Green Weenie, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
San Juan Worm, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook)
Tan Caddis, size 14 - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Pink Shrimp, size 14 - 4 (4 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 16 - 4 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Copper John Nymph, size 16 - 3 (3 Wild Brook)
Black Caddis, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Brown)
Gummy Stonefly, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Black Stonefly Nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Stonefly nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Ladybug, size 16 - 2 (2 Wild Rainbow)
Wet Ant, size 14 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Rainbow)
Bead-head Green Weenie, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Bead-head Hare's Ear Nymph, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Quill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Winged Olive, size 18 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Golden Stonefly, size 8 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Light Cahill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Scud, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Walts Worm, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Angling Breakdown:

Fly Fishing Rod - 93 (26 Wild Brook, 18 Stocked Rainbow, 17 Wild Brown, 15 Wild Rainbow, 12 Stocked Brown, 5 Stocked Brook)
Spinning Rod - 29 (12 Wild Brook, 8 Wild Brown, 5 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Brown)


State Breakdown:
Pennsylvania - 53
New Jersey - 48
North Carolina - 9
Massachusetts - 6
Ohio - 3
Virginia - 2
Maryland - 1

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

Fly Fishing Central Pennsylvania's Spring Creek in Late July

Two weeks ago, my fiancee and I spent a few days camping in central Pennsylvania. While we were ostensibly there to work on wedding stuff, I still found some time to fly fish. We first tried Penns Creek. Despite the cool water temperature, the trout were quiet. It had rained earlier in the day, and I think that the thunder/downpour had put the trout down for the evening. Instead, I caught a few smallmouth bass on a big black marabou streamer. We stopped and photographed some Indian Pipe - a parasitic white plant devoid of chlorophyll - on our hike along the river. It was the first time Jackie and I had encountered this strange flower.

The next night we drove to the Fisherman's Paradise section of Spring Creek. I caught 11 fish - 9 wild rainbows and 2 wild brown. All of the fish fell for either a terrestrial or a shrimp pattern (4 on an inch worm, 4 on a pink shrimp, 2 on a ladybug (!), and 1 on an ant). It was a pleasant central Pennsylvania night, and the fish were willing. I'm convinced there's nothing better. Our time at Spring Creek was marred, however, by one annoying fly fisherman. While I thought fly fishing was known as the "quiet sport," a know-it-all angler spent nearly twenty minutes watching my every move. He kept telling me where to cast, what I was doing wrong, and how to land fish. At first I was polite, and answered his questions. Then as time went by, he became more and more annoying. After I landed a fish, he said "Now you can go back to Hoboken and tell everyone you caught a fish." His condescension and his patronizing attitude were extremely aggravating. I don't know if this guy was trying to impress his friend and young son, but just because my car has a New Jersey license plate doesn't mean I don't know what I'm doing. Oh, and I don't live in fucking Hoboken.

I got my revenge, though, by catching four fish in a row while this guy struggled to catch one. To which my new friend responded by asking, "Are you still using that terrestrial pattern?" Of course I was - it's summer in the northeast, what else would I use?

Image #1 - Indian pipe
Image #2 - 15 inch wild brown
Image #3 - My first fish caught on a ladybug pattern! It can be done.

Overall Total: 121

River Breakdown:

Teetertown Brook - 18 (18 Wild Brook)
Spring Creek - 16 (13 Wild Rainbow, 3 Wild Brown)
Raritan River, South Branch - 12 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Marshalls Creek - 8 (8 Wild Brook)
Swift River - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Elk Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Elk River - 5 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Penns Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Stony Brook - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Paulinskill River - 4 (2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Rockaway Creek - 4 (4 Wild Brown)
Bushkill Creek - 3 (2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brown)
Clear Fork of the Mohican River - 3 (3 Stocked Brown Trout)
Fishing Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Lost Cove Creek - 3 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook)
Old Town Run - 3 (2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Yellow Breeches Creek - 3 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brodhead Creek - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Hickory Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Little Brook - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Roaring Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Big Gunpowder Falls River - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Little Glade Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mill Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mud Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Poplar Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Schooley's Mountain Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Trout Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
White Deer Creek - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Species Breakdown:

Brook Trout - 44
Wild - 38
Stocked - 6

Brown Trout - 39
Wild - 25
Stocked - 14

Rainbow Trout - 38
Stocked - 23
Wild - 15


Wild Trout - 78
Stocked Trout - 43


Trout 15+ Inches: 11


Fly Breakdown:
Olive Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 23 (22 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Bead-head Pheasant Tail Nymph, size 14 - 10 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown)
Green Weenie, size 14 - 8 (4 Wild Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 2 Wild Brown)
Green Weenie, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
San Juan Worm, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook)
Tan Caddis, size 14 - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Pink Shrimp, size 14 - 4 (4 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 16 - 4 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Copper John Nymph, size 16 - 3 (3 Wild Brook)
Black Caddis, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Brown)
Gummy Stonefly, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Black Stonefly Nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Stonefly nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Ladybug, size 16 - 2 (2 Wild Rainbow)
Wet Ant, size 14 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Rainbow)
Bead-head Green Weenie, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Bead-head Hare's Ear Nymph, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Quill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Winged Olive, size 18 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Golden Stonefly, size 8 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Light Cahill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Scud, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)


Angling Breakdown:

Fly Fishing Rod - 92 (26 Wild Brook, 18 Stocked Rainbow, 17 Wild Brown, 15 Wild Rainbow, 12 Stocked Brown, 4 Stocked Brook)
Spinning Rod - 29 (12 Wild Brook, 8 Wild Brown, 5 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Brown)


State Breakdown:
Pennsylvania - 52
New Jersey - 48
North Carolina - 9
Massachusetts - 6
Ohio - 3
Virginia - 2
Maryland - 1

Thursday, July 23, 2009

Fly Fishing Central PA's Yellow Breeches Creek and Old Town Run

Last year I fly fished the Yellow Breeches for the first time. The spot was recommended by a Maryland fly fisherman who attends my fiancee's church. I instantly loved it. While the numerous trout, catch and release restrictions, and beautiful town are all lovely, it is the cold, clear spring water that won me over. Ever since I first fished Penns Creek, I've been fascinated by limestone spring streams. And although I understand the geology responsible for their existence, I am still taken aback by their consistent temperature and their unique color.

The area around Boiling Springs is especially interesting. The Yellow Breeches Creek receives cold water from Old Town Run, a spring-fed tributary that delivers icy 50 degree water to the main river. In addition, this network of catch-and-release waterways is supported by the Yellow Breeches Anglers & Conservation Association. All of this combines to form a superior trout fishery that stays productive year-round.

On my way back from Ohio, I exited off of the Pennsylvania Turnpike and drove to Boiling Springs. I started at the Old Town Run. Throwing inch-worm patterns under the trees enticed a few looks, but not many hits. A few more fish seemed interested in an ant pattern, but, again, none took. Finally, I switched to a san juan worm. The fish went crazy. I took three in the Run, and three in the Yellow Breeches before losing the fly. I caught six trout in the 90 minutes I spent on the water: three browns, two rainbows, and one brook (all were likely stocked, although the brookie was a beautiful fish).


Image #1 - Old Town Run and Yellow Breeches Confluence
Image #2 - Rainbow trout from the Run
Image #3 - Looking upstream


Overall Total: 110

River Breakdown:

Teetertown Brook - 18 (18 Wild Brook)
Raritan River, South Branch - 12 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Marshalls Creek - 8 (8 Wild Brook)
Swift River - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Elk Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Elk River - 5 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Penns Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Spring Creek - 5 (4 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brown)
Stony Brook - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Paulinskill River - 4 (2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Rockaway Creek - 4 (4 Wild Brown)
Bushkill Creek - 3 (2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brown)
Clear Fork of the Mohican River - 3 (3 Stocked Brown Trout)
Fishing Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Lost Cove Creek - 3 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook)
Old Town Run - 3 (2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Yellow Breeches Creek - 3 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brodhead Creek - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Hickory Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Little Brook - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Roaring Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Big Gunpowder Falls River - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Little Glade Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mill Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mud Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Poplar Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Schooley's Mountain Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Trout Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
White Deer Creek - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Species Breakdown:

Brook Trout - 44
Wild - 38
Stocked - 6

Brown Trout - 37
Wild - 23
Stocked - 14

Rainbow Trout - 29
Stocked - 23
Wild - 6


Wild Trout - 67
Stocked Trout - 43


Trout 15+ Inches: 10


Fly Breakdown:
Olive Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 23 (22 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Bead-head Pheasant Tail Nymph, size 14 - 10 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown)
Green Weenie, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
San Juan Worm, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Brown, 2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook)
Tan Caddis, size 14 - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Green Weenie, size 14 - 4 (2 Stocked Brown, 2 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 16 - 4 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Copper John Nymph, size 16 - 3 (3 Wild Brook)
Black Caddis, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Brown)
Gummy Stonefly, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Black Stonefly Nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Stonefly nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Green Weenie, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Bead-head Hare's Ear Nymph, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Quill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Winged Olive, size 18 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Golden Stonefly, size 8 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Light Cahill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Scud, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Wet Ant, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brown)


Angling Breakdown:

Fly Fishing Rod - 81 (26 Wild Brook, 18 Stocked Rainbow, 15 Wild Brown, 12 Stocked Brown, 6 Wild Rainbow, 4 Stocked Brook)
Spinning Rod - 29 (12 Wild Brook, 8 Wild Brown, 5 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Brown)


State Breakdown:
New Jersey - 48
Pennsylvania - 41
North Carolina - 9
Massachusetts - 6
Ohio - 3
Virginia - 2
Maryland - 1

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Fly Fishing Ohio's Clear Fork of the Mohican River

The state of Ohio has only two major trout-rich watersheds. Some of you may be familiar with the Mad River, a well-regarded tailwater stream located in the center-west of the state. I, however, chose to fish the Clear Fork of the Mohican River during my time out in the land of the Buckeyes. My family relocated to Ohio a few years ago, leaving the rolling mountains of eastern Pennsylvania for the flat farmland of south-central Ohio. Luckily, the Clear Fork maintains a decent trout fishery. So I took advantage of the proximity, and drove the 8o miles with my sister Jenna.

Jenna and I spent a considerable amount of time searching for a spot not overrun with people. These visitors weren't fishermen, however. Instead, they were tourists from Cleveland and Columbus (Mohican State Park sits conveniently between the two cities). In almost every river pool, children splashed and dogs swam. Because the river is overrun with campgrounds, canoes, tubes, and kayaks drifted by at a constant pace. Eventually, we ended up at a stretch of the river dotted with tall sycamore trees and teasel flowers. At this spot, a tributary stream dumped cool water into the main river. Situated at the confluence of the tributary was a small whirlpool. It took a few minutes, but I noticed a number of trout feeding in this pool. I drifted them some inch worms and wet ants. Three stocked browns pounced on the terrestrials. Two of them were around 15 inches. Solid fish. These Ohio fish brought my yearly state total up to 7.

Both my sister and I forgot our digital cameras. We had to use my BlackBerry, but I think the images Jenna took came out relatively well.

Image #1 - Clear Fork of the Mohican River
Image #2 - Nice brown trout

Overall Total: 104

River Breakdown:

Teetertown Brook - 18 (18 Wild Brook)
Raritan River, South Branch - 12 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Marshalls Creek - 8 (8 Wild Brook)
Swift River - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Elk Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Elk River - 5 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Penns Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Spring Creek - 5 (4 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brown)
Stony Brook - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Paulinskill River - 4 (2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Rockaway Creek - 4 (4 Wild Brown)
Bushkill Creek - 3 (2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brown)
Clear Fork of the Mohican River - 3 (3 Stocked Brown Trout)
Fishing Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Lost Cove Creek - 3 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook)
Brodhead Creek - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Hickory Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Little Brook - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Roaring Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Big Gunpowder Falls River - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Little Glade Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mill Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mud Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Poplar Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Schooley's Mountain Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Trout Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
White Deer Creek - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Species Breakdown:

Brook Trout - 43
Wild - 38
Stocked - 5

Brown Trout - 34
Wild - 23
Stocked - 11

Rainbow Trout - 27
Stocked - 21
Wild - 6


Wild Trout - 67
Stocked Trout - 37


Trout 15+ Inches: 10


Fly Breakdown:
Olive Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 23 (22 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Bead-head Pheasant Tail Nymph, size 14 - 10 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown)
Green Weenie, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Tan Caddis, size 14 - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Green Weenie, size 14 - 4 (2 Stocked Brown, 2 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 16 - 4 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Copper John Nymph, size 16 - 3 (3 Wild Brook)
Black Caddis, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Brown)
Gummy Stonefly, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Black Stonefly Nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Stonefly nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Green Weenie, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Bead-head Hare's Ear Nymph, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Quill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Winged Olive, size 18 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Golden Stonefly, size 8 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Light Cahill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Scud, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Wet Ant, size 14 - 1 (1 Stockes Brown)


Angling Breakdown:

Fly Fishing Rod - 75 (26 Wild Brook, 16 Stocked Rainbow, 15 Wild Brown, 9 Stocked Brown, 6 Wild Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brook)
Spinning Rod - 29 (12 Wild Brook, 8 Wild Brown, 5 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Brown)


State Breakdown:
New Jersey - 48
Pennsylvania - 35
North Carolina - 9
Massachusetts - 6
Ohio - 3
Virginia - 2
Maryland - 1

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Fly Fishing Maryland's Big Gunpowder Falls

I spent the July 4th weekend in Washington DC. Jackie and I watched the fireworks over the nation's capitol with her family. On my way down from Jersey, I stopped at Maryland's Gunpowder Falls. Receiving consistent cold water deposits from the beautiful Prettyboy Reservoir, the Gunpowder maintains a decent wild brown trout population. I had fished there two years ago, catching nothing. This time my luck was slightly better: I caught one wild brown trout on a size 16 light cahill dry fly.

As I've mentioned in previous posts, I am not enamored with tailwater fisheries. Nevertheless, the Gunpowder is a nice place to spend a few hours. The towering pine trees, sandstone outcroppings, and ample wildlife create a pleasant fishing atmosphere. In addition, any stream that fosters a resident wild trout population only a few miles from the densely-populated northeast metropolitan corridor should be treasured. Furthermore, it will be one of the closest wild trout streams to where I'll be relocating in the coming months.

It should be noted that I caught one wild brook trout on a wooly bugger in Schooley's Mountain Brook. I stopped briefly on my way to visit family in Hackettstown. It was nice to add another two streams and one state to the list.

Image #1 - Gunpowder Falls
Image #2 - Wild brown from Gunpowder Falls
Image #3 - Schooley's Mountain Brook


Overall Total: 101

River Breakdown:

Teetertown Brook - 18 (18 Wild Brook)
Raritan River, South Branch - 12 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Marshalls Creek - 8 (8 Wild Brook)
Swift River - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Elk Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Elk River - 5 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Penns Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Spring Creek - 5 (4 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brown)
Stony Brook - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Paulinskill River - 4 (2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Rockaway Creek - 4 (4 Wild Brown)
Bushkill Creek - 3 (2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brown)
Fishing Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Lost Cove Creek - 3 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook)
Brodhead Creek - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Hickory Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Little Brook - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Roaring Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Big Gunpowder Falls River - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Little Glade Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mill Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mud Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Poplar Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Schooley's Mountain Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Trout Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
White Deer Creek - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Species Breakdown:

Brook Trout - 43
Wild - 38
Stocked - 5

Brown Trout - 31
Wild - 23
Stocked - 8

Rainbow Trout - 27
Stocked - 21
Wild - 6


Wild Trout - 67
Stocked Trout - 34


Trout 15+ Inches: 8


Fly Breakdown:
Olive Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 23 (22 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Bead-head Pheasant Tail Nymph, size 14 - 10 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown)
Green Weenie, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Tan Caddis, size 14 - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Sulphur dun, size 16 - 4 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Copper John Nymph, size 16 - 3 (3 Wild Brook)
Black Caddis, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Brown)
Gummy Stonefly, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Black Stonefly Nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Stonefly nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Green Weenie, size 14 - 2 (2 Wild Rainbow)
Bead-head Green Weenie, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Bead-head Hare's Ear Nymph, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Quill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Winged Olive, size 18 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Golden Stonefly, size 8 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Light Cahill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Scud, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)


Angling Breakdown:

Fly Fishing Rod - 72 (26 Wild Brook, 16 Stocked Rainbow, 15 Wild Brown, 6 Wild Rainbow, 6 Stocked Brown, 3 Stocked Brook)
Spinning Rod - 29 (12 Wild Brook, 8 Wild Brown, 5 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Brown)


State Breakdown:
New Jersey - 48
Pennsylvania - 35
North Carolina - 9
Massachusetts - 6
Virginia - 2
Maryland - 1

Wednesday, July 8, 2009

Fly Fishing New Jersey's Rockaway Creek, Hickory Run, and Little Brook

Last Monday I decided I needed to catch a few wild trout after hooking into all those stocked Massachusetts fish. The Rockaway brown I caught earlier in the year was perhaps the most beautiful fish I've landed in a long time. A reprise seemed appropriate, so I drove north. The river, however, is somewhat tricky to fly fish. Indeed, its big boulders create deep, short holes that prohibit great presentation. These spots also provide trout with ample hiding space. In addition, the Rockaway's clear water enables fish to detect predators (including me) with relative ease. I've had success standing on top of the river's large mid-stream rocks. This allows me to penetrate the aforementioned holes without invading the trout lies. In the end, I caught three more wild brown trout (one on a brown bead-head wooly bugger, one on an olive wooly bugger, and one on a lure).

After my time at Rockaway, I headed to Hickory Run. As I've mentioned in previous posts, Hickory Run is a tributary of the South Branch of the Raritan River. You can access this small wild brook trout fishery by parking near/along Route 513 near Califon. I would, however, advise any enterprising anglers to wait until some of the riparian vegetation will begin to disappear this fall as the stream was overgrown and practically impenetrable. Nevertheless, I caught one wild brook trout on the wooly bugger. After catching that small trout, I followed the stream to its confluence with the South Branch. I then noticed a nearby stream that emptied into the Raritan. I walked over and fished it. Although the streamside conditions were extremely tight, I caught two wild brook trout on a Panther Martin spinner. I later found out that the run is called Little Brook. Feeling content with six wild New Jersey trout, I drove back home and prepared for a busy work week.


Image #1 - Wild brown from the Rockaway
Image #2 - Milkweed in bloom
Image #3 - Overgrown Little Brook

Overall Total: 99

River Breakdown:

Teetertown Brook - 18 (18 Wild Brook)
Raritan River, South Branch - 12 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Marshalls Creek - 8 (8 Wild Brook)
Swift River - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Elk Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Elk River - 5 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Penns Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Spring Creek - 5 (4 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brown)
Stony Brook - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Paulinskill River - 4 (2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Rockaway Creek - 4 (4 Wild Brown)
Bushkill Creek - 3 (2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brown)
Fishing Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Lost Cove Creek - 3 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook)
Brodhead Creek - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Hickory Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Little Brook - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Roaring Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Little Glade Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mill Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mud Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Poplar Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Trout Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
White Deer Creek - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Species Breakdown:

Brook Trout - 42
Wild - 37
Stocked - 5

Brown Trout - 30
Wild - 22
Stocked - 8

Rainbow Trout - 27
Stocked - 21
Wild - 6


Wild Trout - 65
Stocked Trout - 34


Trout 15+ Inches: 8


Fly Breakdown:
Olive Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 22 (21 Wild Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Bead-head Pheasant Tail Nymph, size 14 - 10 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown)
Green Weenie, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Tan Caddis, size 14 - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Sulphur dun, size 16 - 4 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Copper John Nymph, size 16 - 3 (3 Wild Brook)
Black Caddis, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Brown)
Gummy Stonefly, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Black Stonefly Nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Stonefly nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Green Weenie, size 14 - 2 (2 Wild Rainbow)
Bead-head Green Weenie, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Bead-head Hare's Ear Nymph, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Quill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Winged Olive, size 18 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Golden Stonefly, size 8 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Scud, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)


Angling Breakdown:

Fly Fishing Rod - 70 (25 Wild Brook, 16 Stocked Rainbow, 14 Wild Brown, 6 Wild Rainbow, 6 Stocked Brown, 3 Stocked Brook)
Spinning Rod - 29 (12 Wild Brook, 8 Wild Brown, 5 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Brown)


State Breakdown:
New Jersey - 47
Pennsylvania - 35
North Carolina - 9
Massachusetts - 6
Virginia - 2

Thursday, July 2, 2009

Fly Fishing Massachusetts' Swift River

Jackie and I headed up to New England this past weekend. A friend from NYU was getting married in south-central Massachusetts, so I took the opportunity to fish the Swift River. The Swift is a cold tailwater stream that receives the cool discharge from the Quabbin Reservoir. Surrounding the flat, clear river are towering pine trees, grassy fields, wild turkey, and pretty wildflowers. If any of the fly fishermen who read this blog are Bostonians, chances are they've fished the Swift.

To be truthful, I have a love/hate relationship with tailwater streams. On one hand, I can't stand them; indeed, I dislike their freezing cold waters, their unnatural environments, their often non-fertile insect activity, their flatness, and their large size. I prefer my rivers to be undammed and naturally-reproductive; small and fertile; temperate and cascading. The tailwater streams I know are none of the above. On the other hand, though, I recognize that tailwaters provide fly fishing where it would not normally exist (the Swift would be a smallmouth river if not for the Quabbin). They also offer unique challenges, while their (mostly) consistent temperatures render them fishable year round.

My first day at the Swift followed a lengthy car ride from central Jersey. A cold tailwater seemed like a welcome change after hours of traffic and no air conditioning. As soon as we got there, however, the skies opened up. I toughed it out, not knowing if I would be able to return. I was surprised to see trout rise in the pouring rain and I quickly tied on a size 20 cream midge to match the microscopic hatch. Sure enough, a trout went for my fly. It missed. As it turned downstream and chased after my imitation, I caught a fleeting glimpse of its rainbow body. It, however, missed again. Defeated, I left the Swift soaked and shivering.

Lucky for me, I got to return on Sunday. With the wedding a rousing success (congratulations again to Katie and Marc!), another try at one of Massachusetts' most well-known trout streams seemed appropriate. This time, Jackie and I parked next to the reservoir and walked downstream. We thus followed one of two discharges and found ourselves at the river's famous Y Pool. Lurking in this deep, clear, and cold pool were a number of large trout. I landed six, all on an inch worm pattern. Four of the six were 15 inches or longer. In addition, I lost at least a 20 inch brook trout (7x tippet for the clear water ended any chance of catching that behemoth). Three were rainbows, two were browns, and one was a brook. I assume all were stocked. It was a beautiful day, but we needed to get back to Jersey. So after catching my sixth trout, Jackie and I walked back to the car, drove back over the George Washington Bridge, and collapsed after a long weekend.

Image #1 - Mist rising off the Swift
Image #2 - Beautiful rainbow trout
Image #3 - Catching a fish in the Y Pool
Image #4 - Pulling in a nice brown trout
(All photos taken by Jackie)

Overall Total: 93

River Breakdown:

Teetertown Brook - 18 (18 Wild Brook)
Raritan River, South Branch - 12 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 3 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Marshalls Creek - 8 (8 Wild Brook)
Swift River - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Elk Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Elk River - 5 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brook, 1 Wild Brown)
Penns Creek - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Spring Creek - 5 (4 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brown)
Stony Brook - 4 (4 Stocked Rainbow)
Paulinskill River - 4 (2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Rainbow)
Bushkill Creek - 3 (2 Stocked Rainbow, 1 Stocked Brown)
Fishing Creek - 3 (3 Wild Brown)
Lost Cove Creek - 3 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook)
Brodhead Creek - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Wild Brown)
Roaring Run - 2 (2 Wild Brook)
Hickory Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Little Glade Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mill Creek - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Mud Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Poplar Run - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
Rockaway Creek - (1 Wild Brown)
Trout Brook - 1 (1 Wild Brook)
White Deer Creek - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)


Species Breakdown:

Brook Trout - 39
Wild - 34
Stocked - 5

Brown Trout - 27
Wild - 19
Stocked - 8

Rainbow Trout - 27
Stocked - 21
Wild - 6


Wild Trout - 59
Stocked Trout - 34


Trout 15+ Inches: 8


Fly Breakdown:
Olive Wooly Bugger, size 14 - 20 (20 Wild Brook)
Bead-head Pheasant Tail Nymph, size 14 - 10 (8 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown)
Green Weenie, size 12 - 6 (3 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Brook)
Tan Caddis, size 14 - 5 (5 Wild Brown)
Sulphur dun, size 16 - 4 (2 Wild Rainbow, 1 Wild Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Copper John Nymph, size 16 - 3 (3 Wild Brook)
Black Caddis, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Brown)
Gummy Stonefly, size 14 - 3 (2 Wild Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Bead-head Black Stonefly Nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brown, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Brown Stonefly nymph, size 10 - 2 (1 Stocked Brook, 1 Stocked Rainbow)
Green Weenie, size 14 - 2 (2 Wild Rainbow)
Bead-head Green Weenie, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Brook)
Bead-head Hare's Ear Nymph, size 14 - 1 (1 Stocked Rainbow)
Blue Quill, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Blue Winged Olive, size 18 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Golden Stonefly, size 8 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)
Scud, size 16 - 1 (1 Wild Rainbow)
Sulphur dun, size 14 - 1 (1 Wild Brown)


Angling Breakdown:

Fly Fishing Rod - 67 (24 Wild Brook, 16 Stocked Rainbow, 12 Wild Brown, 6 Wild Rainbow, 6 Stocked Brown, 3 Stocked Brook)
Spinning Rod - 26 (10 Wild Brook, 7 Wild Brown, 5 Stocked Rainbow, 2 Stocked Brook, 2 Stocked Brown)


State Breakdown:
New Jersey - 41
Pennsylvania - 35
North Carolina - 9
Massachusetts - 6
Virginia - 2